The Chronicles of Narnia

Narnia

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The Chronicles of Narnia

By C.S. Lewis (originally published in the 1950’s)

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What the Series is About:

Wikipedia.org describes these books perfectly:

The Chronicles of Narnia is a series of seven fantasy novels for children and is considered a classic of children’s literature. Written between 1949 and 1954 and illustrated by Pauline Baynes, the series is Lewis’s most popular work, having sold over 100 million copies in 41 languages. It has been adapted several times, complete or in part, for radio, television, stage and cinema.

Keith’s Reflections:

This marvelous 7-book series (now available in digital format) was one of my favorites to read to my boys when they were young. We spent many hours reading the wonderful tales and adventures masterfully told in these stories. I adapted different voices for the characters as I dramatized the reading for my boys, their young and creative imaginations vividly picturing every scene. I even gave Aslan (the main character, the lion who depicts God/Jesus) an English accent.

My boys still love these stories. They continue to read them on their own and listen to them on CD. These stories are appropriate for all ages, though they will be more meaningful as your children grow, mature, and develop more abstract thinking abilities.

The Author:

Clive Staples Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly called C. S. Lewis and known to his friends and family as “Jack”, was a novelist, poet, academic, medievalist, literary critic, essayist, lay theologian, and Christian apologist from Belfast, Ireland. He held academic positions at both Oxford University (Magdalen College), 1925–1954, and Cambridge University (Magdalene College), 1954–1963. He is best known both for his fictional work, especially The Screwtape Letters, The Chronicles of Narnia, and The Space Trilogy, and for his non-fiction Christian apologetics, such as Mere Christianity, Miracles, and The Problem of Pain. (bio taken from Wikipedia.org)

Target Audience:

Although the books do contain obvious Christian concepts, they are not intended only for Christian audiences. These stories are accessible to all and have been enjoyed by children (and parents) worldwide for many years, as the success of the movies based on these books testifies. In addition to Christian themes, Lewis also borrows characters from Greek and Roman mythology as well as traditional British and Irish fairy tales. 

Narnia

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Click on the image to the left to find this series of books on Amazon.com

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When Our Kids Amaze us

Have you had one of those moments when one of your kids amazed you with how grown up they seem, how articulate they are, or how mature they’ve become, as if you missed a few years of their development somehow? And there they are now, standing before you as a wonderful young man or woman. Where did the time go?

Who is this lovely creature?

I had that experience last May when my two oldest boys, JD and Cal, now sixteen and almost fifteen, went to their spring formal dressed in sport coats and ties. I looked at these two handsome young men in wonder. And truly they looked like men, and they carried themselves that way. I shook my head, and I felt so proud of them.

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I had that wonder-filled experience again a few weeks ago when a friend of mine, Dr. Lori, suggested she interview my youngest son, Kai, about an experience he and I had with one of my painting customers (I’m bi-vocational). She heard Kai tell the story earlier and thought it would be great for other dads to hear. They had so much fun planning it together, and the idea quickly grew to include several other subjects, all related to The Great Dads Project.

I shot the video, and stood there with my mouth hanging open most of the time. I could hardly believe this was my little twelve-year-old son still in braces. His thoughts, ideas, suggestions, insights, humor, and his way with words floored me. Seriously, this kid could be an actor. He was so comfortable on camera, and carried himself with such poise, grace, and presence. I’m not kidding. I know, I’m his dad, I’m bound to think he’s great. But seriously, check this out for yourself, and see if you don’t think he’s as great as I do. Enjoy.

 

If you like this, leave a comment below, and share
a story about a time one of your kids amazed you.


 

To read more from Keith, take a look at his book:

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